William Morris writes a romance

William Morris writes a romance

William Morris

1896

London, England

Printed Book

William Morris's romance The Well at the World's End, with pictures designed by Burne-Jones, was painstakingly produced at Morris's Kelmscott Press at Hammersmith in 1896. Printed on handmade paper, it uses the Press’s own hand-cut and hand-set Chaucer typeface, designed for the monumental Kelmscott edition of Chaucer’s works. The handmade quality of Kelmscott books is itself, of course, a homage to the medieval manuscripts and early printed books beloved of Morris and Burne-Jones. Morris’s narrative is a fantasy of chivalric quest and adventure drawing on the language and motifs of medieval romance. It was amongst the influences shaping the imagination of Lewis and Tolkien, both of whom admired Morris’s medievalist fictions and adaptations.

Supporting Media

Extract from the opening of The Well at the World's End. Read by Dr Nicholas Perkins.

Comments

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