The Knight's Farewell

The Knight's Farewell

Edward Burne-Jones

1858

England

pen and ink on vellum

Edward Burne-Jones (1833–98) was captivated by the medieval manuscripts and narratives that he encountered with William Morris as students at Exeter College, Oxford—especially Malory’s Morte Darthur and Tennyson’s Arthurian poetry. This drawing’s technique also owes much to Albrecht Dürer and the influence of John Ruskin and Dante Gabriel Rossetti. While a violent combat takes place beyond the walled garden, a knight kneels to take leave of his lady, the floreate design of his cloak mingling with the garden setting itself. The inclusion of a figure holding a book of the Grail quest places this scene amidst a narrative that obsessed Burne-Jones throughout his career.

Comments

30/12/2015

gerald

An exquisite drawing.At first knight is invisible in the 'camouflage' of his vestments and it is the character to the right who is the dominant figure. The angel figure on the pennant gives the impression of a comic 'Punch'like figure, the two tails of the pennant becoming 'legs' topped of with a narrow belt of ermine on slender hips, which is the bottom of the angels robe. So it also hasa touch of the 'Escher' with this illusion

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