The Eagle and Child pub

The Eagle and Child pub

building

The Eagle and Child is on St Giles', a broad avenue in Oxford just to the north of the city centre. It has been a public house since c.1650, and has been called The Eagle and Child since at least the late 17th century (it is familiarly known as The Bird and Baby). The name is associated with the coat of arms of the Stanley family, earls of Derby, which includes an eagle snatching a child—a motif used in several medieval romances. Elsewhere on our website you can see a 16th-century version of the arms in MS. Rawl. B. 39. In the 20th century the pub was used as a meeting place for the group of friends known as the Inklings, who included J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis. It still provides a venue for drink and conversation for students, academics, locals and visitors.

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C. S. Lewis’s <em>Sir Gawain and the Green Knight</em>
C. S. Lewis’s Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
<em>Monty Python and the Holy Grail</em>
Monty Python and the Holy Grail
J. R. R. Tolkien, <em>The Lord of the Rings</em>
J. R. R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings
Pauline Baynes illustrates C. S. Lewis
Pauline Baynes illustrates C. S. Lewis
The Eagle and Child pub
The Eagle and Child pub