The Anglo-Norman Romance of Horn

The Anglo-Norman Romance of Horn

Thomas

mid-13th century

England

Manuscript

Le Roman de Horn was written in about 1170 for an audience of Norman aristocrats in the dialect of French used in Britain, but owes its origins to earlier adventure tales straddling Britain, Ireland and the Continent. At a key point in the text, the hero puns on his name, Horn, placing a ring in a drinking horn to reveal his identity and save his lover from a forced marriage. The page shown here marks the end of the poem, in which the author Thomas names himself in the penultimate line, and leaves his son Gilimot to compose a sequel.

Comments

<em>The Song of Roland</em>
The Song of Roland
The Anglo-Norman <em>Romance of Horn</em>
The Anglo-Norman Romance of Horn
The earliest surviving English romances
The earliest surviving English romances
Wax impression of the Grimsby 'Havelok' Seal
Wax impression of the Grimsby 'Havelok' Seal