Spenser, The Faerie Queene

Spenser, The Faerie Queene

Edmund Spenser

1590

London, England

Printed Book

From its famous opening line, ‘A Gentle Knight was pricking on the plaine’, Edmund Spenser’s epic-cum-romance The Faerie Queene invokes a rich fabric of romance structures, motifs and antiquated linguistic forms, which are mingled in a bewildering web of allusions. At a time of intense interest in chivalric tradition and re-enactment at the Elizabethan court, the image of the queen is refracted into a shimmering variety of female protagonists, both virtuous and ambivalent. This copy of the 1590 edition belonged to Sir Thomas Posthumous Hoby (1566–1644), who has annotated portions of the text in an attempt to clarify the twists and turns of its dense narrative.

Comments

25/03/2016

Diana Mellor

this is extraordinary literature

25/03/2016

Diana Mellor

this is extraordinary literature

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