Quarto texts of Pericles

Quarto texts of Pericles

William Shakespeare and George Wilkins

1609 and 1619

London, England

Printed Book

Many medieval romances found new life on the early modern stage. Pericles, first performed in 1607 or 1608, is often described as one of Shakespeare’s ‘late romances’. It retells the Apollonius legend, drawing closely on John Gower’s great fourteenth-century poem Confessio amantis and a prose adaptation of Gower’s story by Lawrence Twine, The Pattern of Painful Adventures (c.1576; reprinted in 1607). Pericles was probably co-written by William Shakespeare and George Wilkins, who published his own prose version in 1608. John Gower himself appears on stage to introduce and conclude the play, and in this bound volume of Shakespeariana we can see the last page of one, unauthorized, quarto edition (1609), and the title page of another (1619).

Comments

The romance of <em>Gamelyn</em>, from a <em>Canterbury Tales</em> manuscript
The romance of Gamelyn, from a Canterbury Tales manuscript
Fragments of the Apollonius of Tyre legend
Fragments of the Apollonius of Tyre legend
Thomas Lodge's <em>Rosalynde</em>
Thomas Lodge's Rosalynde
Quarto texts of <em>Pericles</em>
Quarto texts of Pericles
<em>As You Like It</em>, from the First Folio edition of Shakespeare’s plays
As You Like It, from the First Folio edition of Shakespeare’s plays
Ariosto, <em>Orlando furioso</em>
Ariosto, Orlando furioso
Spenser, <em>The Faerie Queene</em>
Spenser, The Faerie Queene
<em>King Ponthus</em>
King Ponthus
<em>Ponthus et la belle Sidoyne</em>
Ponthus et la belle Sidoyne
An English <em>Don Quixote</em>
An English Don Quixote
An Essex Don Quixote: the story of <em>Sir Billy of Billerecay</em>
An Essex Don Quixote: the story of Sir Billy of Billerecay
A Latin version of Chaucer's <em>Troilus and Criseyde</em>
A Latin version of Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde
Wynkyn de Worde's <em>Richard Coeur de Lyon</em>
Wynkyn de Worde's Richard Coeur de Lyon