Ponthus et la belle Sidoyne

Ponthus et la belle Sidoyne

Anon.

c.1488–90

Lyon, France

Printed Book

The fifteenth century saw a vogue towards rewriting romances in prose, often vastly expanding their already intricate plots. Many French prose romances were read and collected by the English nobility, and were then translated by William Caxton and others for English readers eager to emulate the courtly sensibilities and developing humanism of the French and Burgundian courts. This copy of Ponthus et la belle Sidoyne (a much–altered version of the Horn legend) was produced by Gaspard Ortuin in Lyon, a major early centre of printing in France.

Comments

The romance of <em>Gamelyn</em>, from a <em>Canterbury Tales</em> manuscript
The romance of Gamelyn, from a Canterbury Tales manuscript
Fragments of the Apollonius of Tyre legend
Fragments of the Apollonius of Tyre legend
Thomas Lodge's <em>Rosalynde</em>
Thomas Lodge's Rosalynde
Quarto texts of <em>Pericles</em>
Quarto texts of Pericles
<em>As You Like It</em>, from the First Folio edition of Shakespeare’s plays
As You Like It, from the First Folio edition of Shakespeare’s plays
Ariosto, <em>Orlando furioso</em>
Ariosto, Orlando furioso
Spenser, <em>The Faerie Queene</em>
Spenser, The Faerie Queene
<em>King Ponthus</em>
King Ponthus
<em>Ponthus et la belle Sidoyne</em>
Ponthus et la belle Sidoyne
An English <em>Don Quixote</em>
An English Don Quixote
An Essex Don Quixote: the story of <em>Sir Billy of Billerecay</em>
An Essex Don Quixote: the story of Sir Billy of Billerecay
A Latin version of Chaucer's <em>Troilus and Criseyde</em>
A Latin version of Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde
Wynkyn de Worde's <em>Richard Coeur de Lyon</em>
Wynkyn de Worde's Richard Coeur de Lyon