Ariosto, Orlando furioso

Ariosto, Orlando furioso

Ludovico Ariosto, trans. John Harington

1591

London, England

Printed Book

Various revisions of Ludovico Ariosto’s epic romance Orlando furioso (Mad Orlando) were published between 1516 and 1532. In short, it tells of Orlando’s love for the pagan princess Angelica, but Ariosto’s extravagant narrative traverses the world and beyond, including a trip to the moon to recover Orlando’s lost wits. The story takes its setting from old romances of Charlemagne: the name Orlando is a version of Roland, who appears in a very different setting in, for example, The Song of Roland from the twelfth century. Ariosto’s poem had great influence in England, for example on Spenser’s The Faerie Queene. This English translation was made by Sir John Harington (1560–1612), courtier, author and inventor of the flushing toilet.

Comments

The romance of <em>Gamelyn</em>, from a <em>Canterbury Tales</em> manuscript
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Fragments of the Apollonius of Tyre legend
Thomas Lodge's <em>Rosalynde</em>
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<em>As You Like It</em>, from the First Folio edition of Shakespeare’s plays
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Spenser, <em>The Faerie Queene</em>
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An Essex Don Quixote: the story of <em>Sir Billy of Billerecay</em>
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A Latin version of Chaucer's <em>Troilus and Criseyde</em>
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Wynkyn de Worde's <em>Richard Coeur de Lyon</em>
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