Empires of Romance: Alexander

Empires of Romance: Alexander

Alexander of Macedon (356–323 BC), known as Alexander the Great is, unlike King Arthur, a firmly historical figure. His bold leadership and exceptional series of conquests, stretching from Greece to the Indian sub-continent, secured his heroic reputation as one of the so-called ‘Nine Worthies’, alongside such figures as Hector, Charlemagne and Arthur. Other aspects of his career were also fascinating to medieval writers. Alexander’s tutoring by Aristotle is the framework for books of advice to princes, such as Book 7 of John Gower’s poem Confessio amantis (A Lover's Confession), and exemplifies the ideal of the philosopher-king explored by writers on politics and ethics. Alexander’s supposed discovery of monstrous creatures lurking at the edges of the world is also integral to his hold on medieval imaginations. Both in Eastern and Western traditions, Alexander (Iskandar in Persian) became an exemplar of military prowess, insatiable ambition, and in his death, a warning of the limits of any human achievement.

Origin Stories
Origin Stories
Romance and the Medieval World
Romance and the Medieval World
Truth, Deceit and Desire
Truth, Deceit and Desire
Empires of Romance: Arthur
Empires of Romance: Arthur
Empires of Romance: Alexander
Empires of Romance: Alexander
The Objects of Romance
The Objects of Romance
Cities under Siege
Cities under Siege
Strange Encounters
Strange Encounters
The Fortunes of Sir Gawain
The Fortunes of Sir Gawain
Composing, Writing, Preserving
Composing, Writing, Preserving
The Percy Folio
The Percy Folio
Routes of Romance I
Routes of Romance I
Routes of Romance II
Routes of Romance II
Romance and the Modern World
Romance and the Modern World